Hornbill Unleashed

September 5, 2017

Zaid Ibrahim says in GE14 to represent the poor, less privileged

Filed under: Politics — Hornbill Unleashed @ 8:02 AM

Zaid said the poor among the Malays, ethnic Indians and Chinese, or the Orang Asli all face the same problems, and need more support, facilities and care from their political leaders. — Picture by Yusof Mat IsaFormer minister Datuk Zaid Ibrahim said today he is contesting to be an MP again in order to represent the poor and less-privileged Malaysians, after joining DAP in February.

Zaid, who took a hiatus from politics between 2012 and this year, wrote in his blog that Malaysia must no longer be a “haven for big superpowers and big corporations” to control and monopolise the country’s resources.

“It’s time we give the people of this country what’s due to them. Their fair share of the country’s wealth means better and more affordable public health care, better public schools and a better public transport system.

“We must provide and protect the poor and less privileged. I hope to represent them because for far too long now, this Government has only taken care of the rich and the elites,” Zaid wrote.

The once Kota Baru MP said the poor among the Malays, ethnic Indians and Chinese, or the Orang Asli all face the same problems, and need more support, facilities and care from their political leaders.

“They need the Government to subsidise their cost of living and they need jobs. We must turn this country into a viable and responsible welfare state because poor people need a responsible government to help them,” he said.

In the post, he listed down several of his ideas for a new government, including stricter checks-and-balances on the prime minister’s power, freedom for Muslims, and forging unity through fairness.

“Malaysia must never be a Malay- or Muslim-first country, or a Chinese-first country for that matter. It has to be a country for all of its people,” he said.

“We must forge unity, and for this to succeed we must know the meaning of fairness. Fairness must be our creed, and we must always treat others the way we expect them to treat us.”

Under Umno, Zaid had been law minister during the administration of Tun Abdullah Ahmad Badawi in 2008, but resigned from the post the same year to protest a spate of arrests under the Internal Security Act 1960, resulting in suspension from the ruling party and his eventual exit.

The next year, Zaid joined PKR, and went on to contest the Hulu Selangor by-election in 2010. He lost to Barisan Nasional’s Datuk P. Kamalanathan, who is now deputy education minister.

He quit PKR later that year after pulling out of a race for the party’s deputy president post and formed new party KITA, but later stepped down as its president in 2012.


Source : The Malay Mail Online


 

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5 Comments »

  1. The eventual exposure of a political conspiracy designed as a lifeline to save Umno from political defeat will cause a large number of defections from PAS. This is because grassroots members and supporters of PAS have long fought to remove its arch-enemy, the corrupt and racist Umno, as it is a stumbling block to PAS’ long-cherished dream to fully realise Islamic law in the country.

    That PAS is fearful of this eventuality is evident from its panic-stricken reaction when the Straits Times of Singapore revealed that PAS president Hadi Awang had been in almost daily conversation with Umno president and Prime Minister Najib Razak (even during Hadi’s recovery from his recent heart surgery) to plot to take Selangor from opposition coalition Pakatan Harapan in the next election.

    A chorus of PAS leaders, including deputy president Tuan Ibrahim Tuan Man, then vehemently denied the allegations, while, tellingly, the man at the centre of the issue, Hadi, has remained deafeningly silent.

    Comment by Hattan — September 6, 2017 @ 12:24 PM | Reply

  2. Swak BN MPs need to respond to challenges forwarded by Zaid and other opposition leaders come G14. These MPs played a key role in parlaiment.

    Comment by Farmer — September 5, 2017 @ 10:12 PM | Reply

  3. The rural poor must look beyond family ties, political affiliations to vote with a clear conscience to replace a rogue PM and regime which had plundered the nation and robbed the rakyat of their future and wealth. .

    Comment by Sabri Yaman — September 5, 2017 @ 7:00 PM | Reply

  4. The very reason why the BN government is forced to implement the GST today to collect more taxes is that we have indeed borrowed heavily over the past decade.

    Our federal government debt has increased from RM306.4 billion in 2008 to RM655.7 billion by the end of 2016. Hence the government’s debt increase of 114 percent far outstrips the revenue increase of 77 percent!

    In the language of the prime minister, it is because the reckless BN government has borrowed from the ‘Ah Long’ that Malaysians are now forced to bear the heavy burden of the GST.

    The next question to ask is, why has the BN government borrowed so much and where have all the money gone?

    The answer is simple – waste, corruption and kleptocracy in the BN administration, as epitomised by the 1MDB scandal – which will cost the Malaysian taxpayers at least RM42 billion.

    While 1MDB headlines the extent of the graft and abuse of power in the Najib-led government, it is by no means the only significant scandal under the BN administration.

    Comment by Hattan — September 5, 2017 @ 11:12 AM | Reply

  5. A country’s economic health is directly proportionate to the value of its currency. By that score, it’s not rocket science that we are not doing well at all despite all the propaganda being preached. BN said GDP is good, but how come things are getting expensive while Ringgit us dropping in value?

    Comment by Shirly — September 5, 2017 @ 8:55 AM | Reply


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